Monthly Archives: August 2014

Serial killer on the loose in the Cumberland Valley

CARLISLE, Pa.Sunbury Press has released J. M. West’s first novel in the Carlisle Crime Cases series, Dying for Vengeance: A Christopher Snow & Erin McCoy Mystery.

dfv_fcAbout the Book:
Carlisle Homicide Detective Erin McCoy battles the jitters as the first woman in Homicide partnered with Senior Detective Christopher Snow. On their first case, they track a serial killer who’s stalking family members embroiled in an inheritance dispute. The perp dispatches his victims with toxic chemicals. As the detectives chase clues and connect the related victims, their mutual attraction blooms while she nurses him after a shooting incident. But sparks fly when FBI Special Agent Howard offers McCoy a job if she’ll train at Quantico. McCoy returns to Carlisle when she learns she has a rival for Snow’s affections.

Snow’s former partner, Reese Savage, returns to the CPD from Middle-East deployments expecting to resume their bachelor ways. Savage’s ire results in a PTSD spike while he’s tailing a suspect. In the interim, Chief March reassigns McCoy to the K9 Unit. When Mac becomes a target, she learns that she needs Chris to shove and shock her into life.

 

Carlisle Crime Cases series

Carlisle Crime Cases series

Dying for Vengeance is Jody McGibney West’s first murder mystery/romance featuring Detectives Christopher Snow and Erin McCoy in The Carlisle Crime Cases Series. Interested reader may wish to backtrack and meet the Flowers family in her debut novel,Glory in the Flower.

Excerpt:
Relieved to be finished testifying in a local Domestic Violence case, Detective Erin “Mac” McCoy navigated the courthouse stairs. Clambering down concrete steps, wearing spike heels and a bulky quilted jacket while lugging a purse and briefcase, she longed to change into sweats and chill. The defendant and a few suits were clustered near the famed, charismatic defense attorney Antony Karagianis. His dark, wavy hair and distinctive silver sideburns framed telegenic blue eyes. She skirted the staged tableau. Karagianis nodded as she passed but turned to the cameras to explain why his client had been acquitted, despite slashing his wife and threatening his two kids. At the bottom of the steps, a reporter cornered the defense attorney for a sound bite, sticking the microphone in his face.

“I feel like Sisyphus,” Erin muttered, anger surging at the uphill battle with DV; usually the perp was acquitted—or not even tried because the victim refused to press charges. Hiking to her silver Honda Accord a block down West High, Erin fished for her keys and unlocked the door. A woman across the street, with wavy chestnut hair and oversized sunglasses, stood by a mud-brown Dodge Charger parked at the curb, her hands hidden behind her back.

The acquitted sauntered toward them. A thin navy suit, white shirt, and tie failed to hide the dragon tat on his neck. His long dark hair had been washed and gelled back off his face, his mustache and soul patch shaved for the trial. Seeing the woman wiped the satisfied smirk off his face. He rushed to confront her. “You bitch, you filed charges against me! I warned you!” His meaty hands latched onto her neck, squeezing; his body pinned hers against the vehicle. Before Erin could cross the street to intervene, the woman’s right hand came between the couple. A loud pop, then blood and matter spurted from the exit wound. Cordite filled the air. The dead man kept his balance for a few seconds, and then crumpled to the ground, shot through the heart. The gun clattered to the macadam.

About the Author:
Dying for Vengeance
is the first in the Carlisle Crime Cases series of murder/mysteries featuring Homicide detectives Christopher Snow and Erin McCoy by Jody McGibney West, pseudonym for Joan M. West, Professor Emerita of English Studies at Harrisburg Area Community College, The Gettysburg Campus. She also taught at Messiah College and Shippensburg University as an adjunct and served as Assistant Director of the Learning Center (SU). She has previously published poetry and Glory in the Flower, her debut novel. It depicts four coeds who meet during the turbulent sixties.

She and her husband live near Carlisle, Pennsylvania. They have two sons and two grandsons. In her spare time, West volunteers at the Bookery—Bosler Memorial Library’s used bookstore, participates in the Litwits Book group, and reads voraciously.

Dying for Vengeance: A Christopher Snow & Erin McCoy Mystery
Authored by J. M. West
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
394 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064825
ISBN-10: 1620064820
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Police Procedural

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Dying-for-Vengeance-9781…

“Tweener” girl stumbles upon Native American history in a quiet corner of Pennsylvania

SCRANTON, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Jim Remsen’s YA historical novel Visions of Teaoga, about an adolescent girl who stumbles upon local Native American history.

vot_fcAbout the Book:
The year is 1790 and Queen Esther, a notorious American Indian matriarch, travels under cover to observe a U.S.-Iroquois summit at the ancient Teaoga treaty grounds. Will she be able to pass on her wisdom – and warnings – to the Indian villagers before the hostile settlers discover her in their midst? Will troubled native girl Sisketung awaken to Esther’s truths and see how wrong-headed the brash settler girl Sarah was?

Moving two centuries forward, restless tweener Maddy Winter also visits Teaoga, now a quiet riverfront town on the Pennsylvania-New York border. She tunes in to the region’s dramatic lost history and soon encounters spirits in the wind. As she gains in wisdom, Maddy longs to take on Esther’s mantle of the “peace woman,” but will she find the courage to do right in her own life?

04_massacreDrawing richly from the historical record, Visions of Teaogacaptures a world in upheaval. Readers sit at a native story circle and learn of the tensions and treachery besetting the Eastern frontier. As Maddy and her modern-day compatriots enter the story, they ponder how our history was recorded and by whom. The book is a perfect companion for middle-school history classes, with discussion questions and other supplemental materials provided on the author’s website, www.jimremsen.com.

Excerpt:
“Sheshequin, Madd. Yo, how’s that for a name?”

Maddy jerked awake. “Wuh. Wha-where?”

“We just passed the turnoff to Sheshequin,” her father smiled. “Sorry, girl, you were conked out for a few minutes.”

Maddy righted herself and peered around. “Sheshequin?” It sounded like another Indian word. Earlier on the drive, he’d had her pronounce the names of other spots as they passed: Tunkhannock, Meshoppen, Wyalusing, Towanda. The big river, she knew that one already: Susquehanna. All were place names left over from the original native inhabitants. And all whispered not Texas.

Mr. Winter found an oldies station on the radio and began wah-waahing along to a love ballad. Maddy listened lightly, still too groggy to join in. Once her eyes would stay open and focused, she turned to look outside. They were traveling down on the valley floor now. Not a single cottonwood tree in sight, but those frilly white wildflowers were everywhere. Lots of noisy trucks, too.

Soon something told Maddy to look to the right. Her gaze caught a big slab of rock just ahead. It was sunk in the ground along her side of the road. As they shot past, words flashed by her window: Tea-something. Queen-E-something. Whoa, that was a monument. To a queen? I love queens!

“Wait!” she cried. “Stop!”

About the Author:
Jim Remsen is a professional writer and editor in Philadelphia, where he had a successful career at The Philadelphia Inquirer. Prior to retirement, he was newspaper’s awarding-winning Religion Editor. He also is co-author of The Intermarriage Handbook: A Guide for Jews and Christians (HarperCollins), a widely used bible for mixed-faith couples.

Jim, an avid student of history, stumbled onto the story of Queen Esther and the Bloody Rock while on a road trip. Deciding to bring the poignant saga to life for the young reader, he spent nearly two years researching and writing Visions of Teaoga. He is a member of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, and the Authors Guild. To learn more about Jim, and to access educational materials about Queen Esther’s world, visit his website at http://www.jimremsen.com.

Visions of Teaoga
Authored by Jim Remsen
List Price: $14.95
7″ x 10″ (17.78 x 25.4 cm)
Black & White on White paper
178 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064511
ISBN-10: 1620064510
BISAC: Juvenile Fiction / Historical / United States / Colonial & Revolutionary Periods

Also available on Kindle and Nook

For more information, please see:

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Visions-of-Teaoga-978162…

Tarone’s 41 tales are sure to entertain – “A Pale Horse and 40 Other Tales”

POTTSVILLE, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Joe Tarone’s short story collection “A Pale Horse and 40 Other Tales.”

aph_fcAbout the Book:
Two boys trapped in a collapsing coal mine, embraced only by pitch-black darkness and the sickening squeal of timber being slowly crushed–how could anyone find humor in such a situation? Well, “George’s Priority”, the first little story in “A Pale Horse and 40 Other Tales,” does.

And how could a sprout from an old sassafras stump give a life lesson from father to son? Again, a little story—titled “Sassafras”—just might do it.

What of the statuesque woman whose siren-like scream of “DON’T TOUCH ME,” stopped a wedding reception cold? Even the orchestra, shocked by the scream, stopped! What was her problem? What became of her? Perhaps “Don’t Touch Me” might answer those questions.

“To Kill A Friend” is a story of how beauty often attracts the ugliest of acts. It is one of the few stories in “A Pale Horse and 40 Other Tales” that is not a happy story. Most of the others stand a good chance of making you smile.

Excerpt:

When I went to elementary school, I had to walk only three or four hundred feet to get to school—that’s how close the school was to my home. Consequently, I was able to go home for lunch. It was a part of the day that I shared alone with my mother because my dad and my Uncle Tony (who lived with us) were working, and my sister was in high school. The high school was located in a different town. Mother always had a nice lunch prepared for me. Sometimes, particularly if it was a cold day, she made potato soup. That was my favorite.

On this particular day, I was surprised to find my dad and my uncle were at home at lunchtime. “What’s wrong,” I asked. “Why are you home?”

“The mine is squeezing,” my dad said. “We got out fast. So fast that I left my lunch can in the mine.”

My dad and my uncle operated a little mine. It was not a “bootleg hole.” Those were illegal mines on somebody’s property without the permission of the landowner. My dad and my uncle had leased the land and paid the landowner—the Girard Estate—a royalty on every ton that they mined. Their operation was completely legal. I was too young to realize how serious the mine’s squeezing was, both from a danger standpoint and from the effect it might have on our family’s income.

After school that day, I told my friend George about my dad and uncle having to run out of their mine so fast that my dad left his lunch can behind. Becoming excited, George asked, “So the lunch is still in the mine?” George was always hungry and he could be very persuasive. It wasn’t very long until he had me convinced that we should retrieve the lunch can. We sneaked some candles and matches from one of our homes and off we went, down to the mine.

The mine sloped downward at a very slight angle. It was open. It seemed OK. It seemed perfectly safe to us. We went in about forty feet. George was intrigued with the sound of our voices and the echo they produced bouncing off the face of the coal. He gave a loud, Tarzan-like yell. That was a mistake! The vibration that it caused was enough to make the ceiling—the top rock—fall! Darkness. Complete blackness. Total darkness. Dust that I couldn’t see, but that I felt rushing over me—clinging to me, coating me. The rush of dust-filled air had blown our candles out. It had, in fact, ripped the candle right out of my hand. Breathing was very difficult. The silence was awful. The dark and the silence—it was a living nightmare. Occasionally I heard a rock rolling from the top of the pile of fallen rock that now blocked our exit from the mine. I coughed. “Are you OK?” I asked, needing desperately to know that George was OK; that he was conscious; that I was not alone.

“Can’t breathe,” I heard his weak and frightened voice say.

About the author:

Joe was graduated from Penn State with a degree in Finance.  He lived in Philadelphia and eventually moved to Chester County to work for a small scientific instrument manufacturer which, shortly after his employment there,   was acquired by Hewlett Packard.  After several years in finance with HP, Joe made a major career change and became a Personnel Administrator.

His first book, Some Stones Shine, depicts a decade in his father’s life in the early 20th century.  In it, Tarone has succeeded in describing what life was like in a Coal Region family almost one hundred years ago.

His second book, The Mega-Bite Murders, although obviously a work of fiction, inhabits an environment built upon Joe’s background in the computer and human resource areas.

Caught Up In It, his third book, is a sequel to The Mega-Bite Murders. In it, two supernatural beings set out to eliminate greed in the world.  Sometimes humorous, mostly serious,  Caught Up In It, in it’s closing pages reveals something that could be a surprise to readers of The Mega-Bite Murders.

Upon his retirement from HP, Joe returned to Pennsylvania’s Schuylkill County where he continues to write.  He has served as an auditor in West Mahanoy Township, and as president of the Shenandoah Valley School Board.  He now lives in Raven Run, the anthracite mining village in which he grew up.

A Pale Horse and 40 Other Tales

Authored by Joe Tarone

List Price: $14.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
148 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064603
ISBN-10: 162006460X
BISAC: Fiction / Short Stories

Also available on Kindle and Nook

For more information, please see:

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/A-Pale-Horse-and-40-Othe…